December 22, 2010  

Grantees’ Work Helps Push New START Over the Finish Line

The New Strategic Arms Control Treaty (START) ratified by the Senate today effectively reduces the number of strategic nuclear warheads in the U.S. and Russian arsenals to levels not seen since the first decade of the nuclear age.

Building on almost three decades of work on nuclear issues, current and past Carnegie Corporation grantees have played important roles behind the scenes and more publicly in bringing New START to fruition.  The foundation’s grantees continue to contribute important analyses and commentary about the nature and implications of these developments, and to reach out to the policy community, the media and the public. 

“The ratification of New START marks an important step in reducing the threats posed by nuclear weapons worldwide and strengthening U.S.-Russian relations—major goals of Carnegie Corporation’s International Peace and Security program,” said Vartan Gregorian, president of Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Gregorian continued, “We are very grateful to our grantees for their hard work in helping to move the ratification process forward.  The country, and indeed the world are safer because of their efforts.” 

The treaty calls for Russia and the United States to reduce their arsenals of nuclear weapons by roughly a third and, importantly, includes verification and transparency provisions that are critical to this and future accords. For President Obama, the treaty breathes new life into efforts to press the “reset button” with Russia and marks a first step on the road to a world free of nuclear weapons, which the President called for almost two years ago in a Prague speech.

The ratification of New START marks an important step in reducing the threats posed by nuclear weapons worldwide—a major goal of Carnegie Corporation’s International Peace and Security program. 

More detailed analyses and commentary on recent nuclear developments can be found at Corporation grantee websites, including:

Arms Control Association

The Brookings Institution, Foreign Policy Program 

Bulletin of Atomic Scientists

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Nuclear Policy Program

The Council on Foreign Relations

Federation of American Scientists

James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies,
Monterey Institute of International Studies

Managing the Atom Project, Harvard University

Nonproliferation Education Center

The Nuclear Threat Initiative

Partnership for Global Security

The American Security Project

Learn more about Carnegie Corporation's program on International Peace and Security.